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Lavochkin La-5F

 

Vector, 1/48 scale

S u m m a r y

Catalogue Number: Vector Kit No. VRK 48-002 Lavochkin La-5F
Scale: 1/48
Contents and Media: 47 parts in varicolured resin; 1 clear vacform part; printed acetate sheet (instruments); compound wheels; markings for four aircraft.
Price: USD $87.00 plus postage and handling ($5.50 in the USA, $7.50 elsewhere) available online from Buffie's Best website
Review Type: FirstLook
Advantages: Beautifully detailed; excellent surface features including raised reinforcement strips, restrained fabric texture and crisply engraved panel lines where appropriate; perfectly cast; simple parts breakdown; includes instrument dials on printed sheet; four marking options.
Disadvantages: Multicoloured resin is a little off-putting (but won't effect final result)
Recommendation: Highly Recommended


Reviewed by Brett Green


HyperScale is proudly supported by Squadron.com
 

FirstLook

 

Vector has already released an impressive range of 1/72, 1/48 and 1/32 scale engines that feature jewel-like precision and amazing detail. This Russian company has now turned its hand to full resin kits. The debut releases cover a previously neglected corner of an important family of VVS fighters.

Ian Robertson has already built Vector's first release, the 1/48 scale Lavochkin La-5. In his article, Ian commented that this was one of the easiest kits that he had ever built, injection-moulded or resin.

It was logical that Vector's next release should be the Lavochkin La-5F. The kit comprises 47 parts in varicolured resin; 1 clear vacform canopy; printed acetate sheet for the instrument dials; compound resin and rubber wheels; and markings for four aircraft.

 

Click the thumbnails below to view larger images:


The first impression is surprise at the piebald colouring of the wings and fuselage. Careful examination reveals that this peculiar finish has no adverse effect on the surface of the resin. In fact, the resin is perfectly cast and beautifully detailed with an accurate and restrained combination of raised and recessed detail as appropriate.

The wing is supplied as a single part with the wheel well detail cast in place.

Both the fuselage halves and the wings are cast onto perforated strips. These look daunting but are, in fact, quite easy to remove with a sharp hobby blade and some care. After a few additional minutes cleanup with a sanding stick, these main components will be ready for assembly.

 

 

Sidewall detail is cast onto the insides of the fuselage halves. This will also speed construction.

 

 

A separate cockpit "floor" is supplied, as is a very nice pilot's seat with the harness cast in place. The instrument panel is resin too, with a separate sheet supplied with printed acetate instruments. For some reason the instrument panel is not mentioned in the instructions, so make sure that you remember to install it prior to mating the fuselage halves!

 

 

Vector includes markings for four aircraft, all in the late-war two-tone grey upper surfaces. Decals are in register and fairly crisply printed.

 

 

Instructions are supplied on a single sheet with a parts layout and construction diagrams. Considering the simplicity of parts breakdown, they are adequate.

 

 

Conclusion

 

Resin casting technology has reached a level of sophistication in 2006 that is seeing some very ambitious full kits hitting the marketplace. In the best of these releases, cleanup of parts before assembly is easier, the main parts are thinner and less prone to warpage, and detail is world-class.

Vector's 1/48 scale Lavochkin La -5F and its predecessor, the La-5, meet all of these high standards. I am looking forward to seeing what else Vector has in the production pipleline.

If you have already dabbled with resin accessories and are considering your first full-resin kit, this would be an ideal choice.

Highly Recommended.

Review kit purchased with HyperScale funds


Review Text Copyright 2006 by Brett Green
Page Created 1 June, 2006
Last updated 31 May, 2006

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